You're receiving this newsletter because you signed up at one of our info tables.

Having trouble reading this email? View it in your browser.

 

No. 181

 
   

eBlast

Weekly Mental Health News and Research
 
 

IN THIS ISSUE


Can what you eat affect your mental health? New research links diet and the mind.

Despite Diffuse Brain Damage, No Signs of 'Concussion' in Rats

Kids Benefit From Counseling At The Pediatrician's Office

The Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar — Even When the Conscious Mind Fails

The eBlast is a collection of news, research, trainings, and volunteer opportunities presented by Mental Health America of Montana.

 

Can what you eat affect your mental health? New research links diet and the mind.

Research exploring the link between diet and mental health “is a very new field; the first papers only came out a few years ago,” said Michael Berk, a professor of psychiatry at the Deakin University School of Medicine in Australia. “But the results are unusually consistent, and they show a link between diet quality and mental health.”

“Diet quality” refers to the kinds of foods that people eat, how often they eat them and how much of them they eat. In several studies, including a 2011 analysis of more than 5,000 Norwegians, Berk and his collaborators have found lower rates of depression, anxiety and bipolar disorder among those who consumed a traditional diet of meat and vegetables than among people who followed a modern Western diet heavy with processed and fast foods or even a health-food diet of tofu and salads.

Read the entire piece on the Washington Post site.

 

Despite Diffuse Brain Damage, No Signs of 'Concussion' in Rats

A standard experimental model of concussion in rats causes substantial brain damage—but no behavioral changes comparable to those seen in patients with concussion, reports a study in the April issue of Neurosurgery, official journal of the Congress of Neurological Surgeons. The journal is published by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, a part of Wolters Kluwer Health.

The results highlight the "disconnect" between preclinical and clinical studies of concussion, according to the report by Dr. Charles L. Rosen of West Virginia University, Morgantown, and colleagues. The study also adds to concerns over the possible long-term effects of repeated, "subconcussive" brain trauma—causing no concussion symptoms—in humans.

Read the entire article on the Wolters Kluwer website.

 

Kids Benefit From Counseling At The Pediatrician's Office

Pediatricians often recommend some mental health counseling for children who have behavior problems like defiance and tantrums. But counseling can be hard to find. Children are much more likely to get help if the counselor is right there in the doctor's office, a study finds.

The children in the study had behavior problems, and many also had attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or anxiety. They were 8 years old, on average, and two-thirds were boys. Half of the 321 children were referred to outside counselors who took the family's insurance.

The other half had six to 12 individual or family counseling sessions with social workers placed in pediatricians' offices as part of the study, which was conducted by the University of Pittsburgh School of the Health Sciences.

Read the more about this research on the NPR website.

 

The Unconscious Mind Can Detect a Liar — Even When the Conscious Mind Fails

When it comes to detecting deceit, your automatic associations may be more accurate than conscious thought in pegging truth-tellers and liars, according to research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

The findings suggest that conscious awareness may hinder our ability to detect whether someone is lying, perhaps because we tend to seek out behaviors that are supposedly stereotypical of liars, like averted eyes or fidgeting. But those behaviors may not be all that indicative of an untrustworthy person.

Read the more on the Association of Psychological Science website.

 
 

Upcoming Events

Training: Trauma‐Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Traumatized Children and Their Families (Great Falls)

March 31-April 1 3rd at the Center for Mental Health, 915 1st Ave South, Great Falls, MT (McFadden Room).

Info at the link below

Info here

Training: Trauma‐Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Traumatized Children and Their Families (Missoula)

April 3-April 4 at the Courtyard by Marriott, 4559 N Reserve St, Missoula, MT 59808

Info at the link below

Info here

 

 

 

New Depression Support Group starts March 6th!

Registration details below

The group is free, is lead by a certified peer specialist, and meets by phone to assure availability to Montanans from across the state can gain support.

Email for info or call 406-587-7774

Educational Opportunities

New online course: Relational Development

The course combines research in Neuroscience, childhood trauma, grief and loss, child development, and family systems to create a broader, effective method of caring for emotionally distressed children - course offered by University of Montana.

Click here for Info

 

Job Opportunity

MHA of MT is hiring for a P/T on-call workers to work with youths in crisis in Glasgow and Plentywood Montana

Email for Info

 

Research Opportunities

NIMH: Schizophrenia Pediatric Research Study (6-18 y/o)

Study investigates the causes and treatment of childhood psychotic disorders that start prior to age 12.

Click here for Info